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A bee pollinates a flower along the St. Thomas Pollinator Path. 

Pollinator Path

About the Pollinator Path

The Pollinator Path is a series of gardens, some planted to attract pollinators and some planted for aesthetic purposes. These gardens allow students, faculty, staff and visitors to study pollinator activity and learn how to support declining pollinator populations.  

The Pollinator Path has been providing food and habitat for a wide variety of pollinators and a "living laboratory" for the study of pollinators by students and the community for four years. We have studied what plants attract pollinators and adjusted our flowerbeds to encourage the maximum number of diverse pollinators throughout the season.

Contact

Catherine Grant

Greenhouse Manager
Phone Number
(651) 962-3250
Student examines flowers along the Pollinator Path. 

01 Discover St. Thomas’ pollinators

Walk the Pollinator Path

The Pollinator Path allow students, faculty, staff and visitors to study pollinator activity and learn how to support declining pollinator populations.

Exploring Pollinator Pathways
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Eight different species of bumblebees have been identified on campus.
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The Pollinator Path has more than tripled the number of bumble bees on campus.
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Ten species of butterflies and moths have been identified on campus.

St. Thomas’ Pollinators

Pollinators on campus fall generally into these types: honey bees (non-native, but still very important), native bees (including bumblebees), wasps, syrphid flies, butterflies, moths and beetles. Here are a few pollinators we have spotted on campus recently.

A rusty patched bumblee on a flower.

Rusty-Patched Bumblebee

Rusty patched bumble bees live in colonies that include a single queen and female workers. The colony produces males and new queens in late summer.

Rusty-Patched Bumblebee
Bumblebee on a flower.

Bumblebees

Bumblebees are generally stockier and more heavy-bodied than honeybees. They can grow to be quite large.

Bumblebees
Monarch butterfly on a flower.

Monarch Butterflies 

The monarch butterfly is among the most recognized, studied and loved of all of North America’s insects.

Monarch Butterflies

Contact Information

Questions? Please feel free to reach out if you have questions about the greenhouses.

Mailing Address

OWS 352 
University of St. Thomas 
2115 Summit Avenue 
St. Paul, MN 55105

Campus Location

The greenhouses are Buildings #3 and #66 on the campus map.