Favorites ()
Apply
A student looks at a screen filled with code during a computer science class.

Solve real-world problems

Computer and Information Sciences

About the Department of Computer and Information Sciences

In recognition of the importance of being able to analyze data in the modern world, the Department of Computer and Information Sciences at the University of St. Thomas strives to develop the technical and statistical knowledge and skills our students need to succeed in an array of fast-paced careers.

Our computer science and statistics programs will challenge you by focusing on a variety of topics, such as software design and implementation, computer architecture, database designs, algorithms, data mining, artificial intelligence and predictive modeling. Our focus on comprehensive problem-based learning strategies through the liberal arts gives you the skills you need to lead in organizations.

Prepared for the Future

A major or minor in computer science or statistics will give you access to faculty, small classes and multiple opportunities to apply what you are learning to real-world issues.

Related Programs

Our programs pair well with multiple other programs at St. Thomas.

Outside the Classroom

There are a number of opportunities for you engage with faculty, your peers and industry partners outside of the classroom.

Computer Science Club students pose for a photo in front of their display at the Spring Activities Fair.

Computer Science Club

The Computer Science Club is run by students majoring or minoring in computer science and is open to all students interested in computers and their applications.

Computer Science Club
Professor Arkady Shemyakin speaks during presentations in one of his statistics courses.

Applied Probability and Statistics Seminars

The Applied Probability and Statistics Seminar attracts students and faculty, as well as a number of industry representatives.

Recent Faculty Research

  • Chronic Wasting Disease
  • Head Mounted Displays
  • Chronic Wasting Disease

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a fatal prion disease of deer, elk and moose transmitted through direct animal-to-animal contact and indirectly through contact with prions deposited by infected animals. Prions can remain infectious in the environment for at least two years after being deposited, so herd reduction via wide-scale culling has thus far proven to be insufficient to halt the spread.

    Localized management in the form of intensive, non-selective culling of deer over a small geographical area may provide a suitable alternative for management of CWD in white-tailed deer. Dr. Sergey Berg uses simulation models to compare the effectiveness of different scales of localized management to wide-scale herd reduction in controlling the spread of CWD through deer populations of varying densities.

    Preliminary results suggest that intensive removal of deer over a small area may provide a more effective control strategy than the broad-scale approaches currently used to manage CWD without severely reducing overall abundance.

    Head Mounted Displays

    Head mounted displays (HMDs) can provide users with an immersive virtual reality (VR) experience, but often are limited to viewing a single environment or data set at a time.

    Dr. Tommy Marrinan and Leah Emerson ’20 partnered with Dr. Heather Shirey in art history and graduate English student Theresa Malloy on a project that co-located users in the real world can help provide additional context and steer virtual experiences. With the use of a separate canvas, such as a large-scale display wall, non-immersed users can view a multitude of contextual information. This information can be used to drive the VR user’s interactions and lead to deeper understanding.

    They highlight two digital humanities use cases that capture real locations using a 360° camera: urban art and urban community gardens. In both cases, HMDs allow users to view a space and its surroundings, while non-immersed users can help with tasks such as placing overlays with auxiliary information, navigating between related spaces, and directing the VR user's actions.

    Chronic Wasting Disease

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a fatal prion disease of deer, elk and moose transmitted through direct animal-to-animal contact and indirectly through contact with prions deposited by infected animals. Prions can remain infectious in the environment for at least two years after being deposited, so herd reduction via wide-scale culling has thus far proven to be insufficient to halt the spread.

    Localized management in the form of intensive, non-selective culling of deer over a small geographical area may provide a suitable alternative for management of CWD in white-tailed deer. Dr. Sergey Berg uses simulation models to compare the effectiveness of different scales of localized management to wide-scale herd reduction in controlling the spread of CWD through deer populations of varying densities.

    Preliminary results suggest that intensive removal of deer over a small area may provide a more effective control strategy than the broad-scale approaches currently used to manage CWD without severely reducing overall abundance.

    Head Mounted Displays

    Head mounted displays (HMDs) can provide users with an immersive virtual reality (VR) experience, but often are limited to viewing a single environment or data set at a time.

    Dr. Tommy Marrinan and Leah Emerson ’20 partnered with Dr. Heather Shirey in art history and graduate English student Theresa Malloy on a project that co-located users in the real world can help provide additional context and steer virtual experiences. With the use of a separate canvas, such as a large-scale display wall, non-immersed users can view a multitude of contextual information. This information can be used to drive the VR user’s interactions and lead to deeper understanding.

    They highlight two digital humanities use cases that capture real locations using a 360° camera: urban art and urban community gardens. In both cases, HMDs allow users to view a space and its surroundings, while non-immersed users can help with tasks such as placing overlays with auxiliary information, navigating between related spaces, and directing the VR user's actions.

    Expand your horizons

    Study Abroad

    University of Edinburgh in Scotland courtyard

    University of Edinburgh – Scotland

    You have the opportunity to complete graduation requirements while exploring the rich history of Scotland.

    Office of Study Abroad
    Avon River in Christchurch, New Zealand on a sunny day.

    University of Canterbury – New Zealand

    Christchurch is home to the University of Canterbury, the second-oldest university in New Zealand.

    Office of Study Abroad

    Faculty

    Our faculty are active scholars that are eager to collaborate with students on academic research.

    Headshot of Dr. Sarah Miracle

    Dr. Sarah Miracle

    Dr. Miracle and Dr. Scott Yilek publish work in the area of format-preserving encryption. They recently presented their finds at the 25th Conference on Selected Areas in Cryptography.

    Dr. Sarah Miracle
    Headshot of Dr. Sergey Berg

    Dr. Sergey Berg

    Dr. Berg uses statistical simulations to compare strategies for combating the spread of chronic wasting disease in Minnesota.

    Dr. Sergey Berg
    Headshot of Dr. Amelia McNamara

    Dr. Amelia McNamara

    Dr. McNamara teaches courses in statistics, data visualization and statistical research methods.

    Dr. Amelia McNamara

    Contact Us

    Questions? Feel free to reach out to learn more about our programs.

    Mailing Address

    Mail OSS 402
    University of St. Thomas
    2115 Summit Avenue
    St. Paul, MN 55105

    Campus Location

    We are located on the fourth floor of the O’Shaughnessy Science Hall