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Theology Engaging with Science

The Science and Theology Network

About the Science and Theology Network

The Science and Theology Network (STN) is a group of faculty, theologians, scientists, students, clergy, lay people and interested others who desire to engage with contemporary topics in science and theology.

We offer public lectures, faculty forums, a reading group and special events throughout the year that include how scientific developments like evolution, neuroscience and cosmology can be understood theologically. Our sole mission is to create forums that highlight the interactions between science and theology.

Upcoming Events

Lectures, Videos and Manuscripts

We offer public lectures, faculty forums, a reading group and special events throughout the year that include how scientific developments like evolution, neuroscience and cosmology can be understood theologically.

The Network's Leaders

  • Peter Distelzweig
  • Andrew Hansen
  • Alan C. Love
  • Michael Naughton
  • Alan Padgett
  • Philip Rolnick
  • Walter J. Schultz
  • Lisanne Winslow
  • Jeff Jalkio
  • Peter Distelzweig

    Peter Distelzweig is an assistant professor in Philosophy and the director of the Science, Medicine, and Society Minor. He specializes in early modern philosophy, and the history and philosophy of science and medicine. He is also interested in ancient philosophy and science- especially that of Aristotle.

    Andrew Hansen

    Andrew Hansen is program director at Anselm House, a Christian study center at the University of Minnesota. He holds a PhD in modern European intellectual history from the University of Notre Dame.

    Alan C. Love

    Alan C. Love is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Minnesota and Director of the Minnesota Center for Philosophy of Science. His research concentrates on concepts, methods and reasoning in developmental and evolutionary biology with a special focus on conceptual change, explanatory pluralism, the structure of evolutionary theory, reductionism, the nature of historical science and interdisciplinary epistemology.

    Michael Naughton

    Michael Naughton is director of the Center for Catholic Studies at the University of St. Thomas, where he holds the Koch Chair in Catholic Studies. He is author, co-author and co-editor of 10 books and over 50 articles. His next coauthored book is called What We Hold in Trust: Rediscovering the Purpose of Catholic Higher Education (due out November 2020, The Catholic University of America Press, coauthors Don Briel and Ken Goodpaster).

    Alan Padgett

    Alan Padgett is a philosopher and theologian with a life-long interest in natural science. His is Professor of Systematic Theology at Luther Seminary in Minnesota, where he teaches courses in Christian theology and ethics. Author, editor and co-author of twelve books and over 100 academic essays, he is known for his contributions to Christian theology, philosophy of religion, theology and science and systematic theology. A recent work is The Blackwell Companion to Science and Christianity (co-edited with J. B. Stump, 2012). A work in progress is an edited volume in dialogue form about directions in Christian eco-theology.

    Philip Rolnick

    Philip Rolnick is Professor of Theology at the University of St. Thomas and serves as Chair of the Science and Theology Network (STN). As the author of many theological books and articles, his major research areas have been: 1) analogy—how words refer to God; 2) what personhood means for Christian faith; 3) the relation of science and Christian theology; and 4) the thought of C. S. Lewis. Philip Rolnick has been the recipient of the Exemplary Teacher Award of Greensboro College, several Templeton Foundation grants, a North Carolina Humanities Scholar and the University Scholars Grant from the University of St. Thomas. He has been a member of Princeton’s Center of Theological Inquiry and Notre Dame’s seminar on Human Distinctiveness.

    Walter J. Schultz

    Walter J. Schultz holds a BA, MA and PhD in Philosophy with doctoral specializations in mathematical logic and economic theory. He studied economics personally with Leonid Hurwicz who later won the Nobel Prize in Economics in 2007. Dr. Schultz has been profoundly influenced by the Christ-centeredness of the 18th century theologian/ philosopher Jonathan Edwards. His work over the last 15 years has been to explore how the philosophy of mathematics and the metaphysics of science can be understood by taking as fundamental the idea that God is acting according to his plans for his purposes in Christ.

    Lisanne Winslow

    Lisanne Winslow is a professor in the department of Biology and Biochemistry with joint appointment in the department of Biblical and Theology Studies at the University of Northwestern – St. Paul. Dr. Winslow has an MS and PhD in Cell Biology and Biochemistry from Rutgers University, and MA in Theology and Religion from United Theological Seminary, and a PhD in Systematic Theology and Divinity from the University of Aberdeen, Scotland. She conducts research in marine biology using to world oceans to study invertebrate immunity. In her theological work she has formulated a constructive Trinitarian Theology of Nature. Dr. Winslow has extensively used Jonathan Edwards, Karl Barth, Emil Brunner, and Alister McGrath for much of her analyses. She is an ordained Congregationalist minister serving at Mendota Heights UCC.

    Jeff Jalkio

    Jeff Jalkio received his PhD in Electrical Engineering from the University of Minnesota and worked for several years in industry in the fields of optical sensor design and process control. In 1984, he co-founded CyberOptics Corporation, where he headed research and development. In 1997, he returned to academia, joining the engineering faculty of the University of St. Thomas where he taught courses in electronics, mechatronics, controls, statistics, electromagnetic fields and design. Most of his research has been on optical metrology and the use of real-time measurement and analysis for process control in manufacturing but more recently it has focused on measurement uncertainty and how to deal with it. This includes the fundamental sources of noise, error, and uncertainty as well as analysis and design of equipment and algorithms for reducing them. He joined the St. Thomas physics faculty in 2008.

    Peter Distelzweig

    Peter Distelzweig is an assistant professor in Philosophy and the director of the Science, Medicine, and Society Minor. He specializes in early modern philosophy, and the history and philosophy of science and medicine. He is also interested in ancient philosophy and science- especially that of Aristotle.

    Andrew Hansen

    Andrew Hansen is program director at Anselm House, a Christian study center at the University of Minnesota. He holds a PhD in modern European intellectual history from the University of Notre Dame.

    Alan C. Love

    Alan C. Love is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Minnesota and Director of the Minnesota Center for Philosophy of Science. His research concentrates on concepts, methods and reasoning in developmental and evolutionary biology with a special focus on conceptual change, explanatory pluralism, the structure of evolutionary theory, reductionism, the nature of historical science and interdisciplinary epistemology.

    Michael Naughton

    Michael Naughton is director of the Center for Catholic Studies at the University of St. Thomas, where he holds the Koch Chair in Catholic Studies. He is author, co-author and co-editor of 10 books and over 50 articles. His next coauthored book is called What We Hold in Trust: Rediscovering the Purpose of Catholic Higher Education (due out November 2020, The Catholic University of America Press, coauthors Don Briel and Ken Goodpaster).

    Alan Padgett

    Alan Padgett is a philosopher and theologian with a life-long interest in natural science. His is Professor of Systematic Theology at Luther Seminary in Minnesota, where he teaches courses in Christian theology and ethics. Author, editor and co-author of twelve books and over 100 academic essays, he is known for his contributions to Christian theology, philosophy of religion, theology and science and systematic theology. A recent work is The Blackwell Companion to Science and Christianity (co-edited with J. B. Stump, 2012). A work in progress is an edited volume in dialogue form about directions in Christian eco-theology.

    Philip Rolnick

    Philip Rolnick is Professor of Theology at the University of St. Thomas and serves as Chair of the Science and Theology Network (STN). As the author of many theological books and articles, his major research areas have been: 1) analogy—how words refer to God; 2) what personhood means for Christian faith; 3) the relation of science and Christian theology; and 4) the thought of C. S. Lewis. Philip Rolnick has been the recipient of the Exemplary Teacher Award of Greensboro College, several Templeton Foundation grants, a North Carolina Humanities Scholar and the University Scholars Grant from the University of St. Thomas. He has been a member of Princeton’s Center of Theological Inquiry and Notre Dame’s seminar on Human Distinctiveness.

    Walter J. Schultz

    Walter J. Schultz holds a BA, MA and PhD in Philosophy with doctoral specializations in mathematical logic and economic theory. He studied economics personally with Leonid Hurwicz who later won the Nobel Prize in Economics in 2007. Dr. Schultz has been profoundly influenced by the Christ-centeredness of the 18th century theologian/ philosopher Jonathan Edwards. His work over the last 15 years has been to explore how the philosophy of mathematics and the metaphysics of science can be understood by taking as fundamental the idea that God is acting according to his plans for his purposes in Christ.

    Lisanne Winslow

    Lisanne Winslow is a professor in the department of Biology and Biochemistry with joint appointment in the department of Biblical and Theology Studies at the University of Northwestern – St. Paul. Dr. Winslow has an MS and PhD in Cell Biology and Biochemistry from Rutgers University, and MA in Theology and Religion from United Theological Seminary, and a PhD in Systematic Theology and Divinity from the University of Aberdeen, Scotland. She conducts research in marine biology using to world oceans to study invertebrate immunity. In her theological work she has formulated a constructive Trinitarian Theology of Nature. Dr. Winslow has extensively used Jonathan Edwards, Karl Barth, Emil Brunner, and Alister McGrath for much of her analyses. She is an ordained Congregationalist minister serving at Mendota Heights UCC.

    Jeff Jalkio

    Jeff Jalkio received his PhD in Electrical Engineering from the University of Minnesota and worked for several years in industry in the fields of optical sensor design and process control. In 1984, he co-founded CyberOptics Corporation, where he headed research and development. In 1997, he returned to academia, joining the engineering faculty of the University of St. Thomas where he taught courses in electronics, mechatronics, controls, statistics, electromagnetic fields and design. Most of his research has been on optical metrology and the use of real-time measurement and analysis for process control in manufacturing but more recently it has focused on measurement uncertainty and how to deal with it. This includes the fundamental sources of noise, error, and uncertainty as well as analysis and design of equipment and algorithms for reducing them. He joined the St. Thomas physics faculty in 2008.

    Contact Information

    Interested in learning more? We'd love to hear from you.

    Phone: (651) 962-5319
    Dr. Philip Rolnick: parolnick@stthomas.edu
    Fax: 651-962-5310

    Mailing Address

    University of St. Thomas: Science and Theology Network
    Mail #JRC 109
    2115 Summit Ave
    Saint Paul, MN 55105

    Campus Location

    Our offices are located on the first floor of the John Roach Center for the Liberal Arts.